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: 247 documentos

Obama's Goal: Halving the Budget Deficit by 2012. Really?
The President's message on fiscal responsibility -- that he'll cut the current one by half by the end of his first term -- is smart politics right now, but it may be dumb politics by November of 2012, and doesn't make much economic sense regardless.
robert reich | robertreich.blogspot.com | 24-02-2009

Hope and Trust, and the Mini Depression
In this world of economic distrust, it's vitally important that President Obama and his administration maintain credibility on the economy. Raising false expectations would do far more harm than good. In remarks aired this morning on ABC's "Good Morning America," former president Bill Clinton said he wanted the American people to know that Obama is "confident that we are gonna get out of this and he feels good about the long run. ... I just would like him to end by saying that he is hopeful and completely convinced we're gonna come through this." Clinton's suggestion is understandable but misguided. Happy talk at this point in time is so incongruous with what most Americans (and others around the world) know and are experiencing that it could undermine Obama's credibility.
robert reich | robertreich.blogspot.com | 22-02-2009

Who’ll Stop the Pain?
So people at the Fed are troubled by the same question I’ve been obsessing on lately: What’s supposed to end this slump? No doubt this, too, shall pass — but how, and when? To be sure, the Obama administration is taking action to help the economy, but it’s trying to mitigate the slump, not end it. Let’s be clear: the Obama administration’s policy initiatives will help in this difficult period — especially if the administration bites the bullet and takes over weak banks. But still I wonder: Who’ll stop the pain?
paul krugman | nytimes.com | 20-02-2009

The Stimulus and the Auto Bailout: The Perils of Confusing American Companies With American Jobs
Do not confuse American companies with American jobs. Why pay the Big Three billions of taxpayer dollars to stay afloat when, even after being bailed out, they cut tens of thousands of American jobs, slash wages, and shrink their American operations into small fractions of what they used to be?
robert reich | robertreich.blogspot.com | 18-02-2009

Japanese Finance Minister Resigns After Appearing Drunk At Summit.
Nakagawa - who is known to enjoy a drink - denied he was drunk when he addressed the Japanese press on Saturday. He instead blamed his bumbling and at times incomprehensible performance on an overdose of cold medicine. Watch the video of the minister's slurred performance.
jessica gusman | huffingtonpost.com | 17-02-2009

Rise in Jobless Poses Threat to Stability Worldwide
Worldwide job losses from the recession that started in the United States in December 2007 could hit a staggering 50 million by the end of 2009, according to the International Labor Organization, a United Nations agency. The slowdown has already claimed 3.6 million American jobs. High unemployment rates, especially among young workers, have led to protests in countries as varied as Latvia, Chile, Greece, Bulgaria and Iceland and contributed to strikes in Britain and France.
nelson d. schwartz | nytimes.com | 14-02-2009

Failure to Rise
The plan sketched out by Tim Geithner, the Treasury secretary, wasn’t bad, exactly. What it was, instead, was vague. It left everyone trying to figure out where the administration was really going. Will those public-private partnerships end up being a covert way to bail out bankers at taxpayers’ expense? Or will the required “stress test” act as a back-door route to temporary bank nationalization (the solution favored by a growing number of economists, myself included)? Nobody knows.
paul krugman | nytimes.com | 13-02-2009

Worlds Largest Hydrogen-Powered Town Starts in Japan
Some 150 homes in the housing communities in Maebaru City, of southern Japan's Fukuoka Prefecture, are running on hydrogen fuel cells, as part of a pilot project testing the feasibility of such systems for households. The “Fukuoka Hydrogen Town" model project is the beginning of what organizers say will be the largest hydrogen-powered city in the world.
alex pasternack | treehugger.com | 09-02-2009

Once the Stimulus Kicks In, the Real Fight Begins
The real stimulus debate hasn't even started yet. Congress will pass President Obama's stimulus package in the next two weeks, more or less as he wants it. The House has already done its part, and the Senate appears likely to follow suit. But when the economy starts to turn up again, perhaps as early as next year, the president will have the real tough decisions to make. He'll have to choose which spending will continue -- or whether any of it will continue at all.
robert reich | washingtonpost.com | 01-02-2009

On the Edge
It’s no wonder, then, that most economic forecasts warn that in the absence of government action we’re headed for a deep, prolonged slump. Some private analysts predict double-digit unemployment. Worst of all is the possibility that the economy will, as it did in the ’30s, end up stuck in a prolonged deflationary trap.
paul krugman | nytimes.com | 06-02-2009

500K Jobs Lost In January
Economists, on average, estimate that at least 524,000 more jobs vanished in January alone, and some think the figure will total around 700,000. The unemployment rate _ now at 7.2 percent _ is expected to jump to 7.5 percent, a 17-year peak, in January when the government releases new figures Friday.
jeannine aversa | huffingtonpost.com | 04-02-2009

The Real Fight Starts After the Stimulus is Enacted
The real stimulus debate has not even started yet. Congress will pass President Obama's stimulus package in the next two weeks, more or less as he wants it. The House has already done its part, and the Senate appears likely to follow suit. But when the economy starts to turn up again, perhaps as early as next year, the president will have the real tough decisions to make. He will have to choose which spending will continue -- or whether any of it will continue at all.
robert reich | robertreich.blogspot.com | 02-02-2009

Nationalization Gets a New, Serious Look
Washington.- Only five days into the Obama presidency, members of the new administration and Democratic leaders in Congress are already dancing around one of the most politically delicate questions about the financial bailout: Is the president prepared to nationalize a huge swath of the nation’s banking system? “Well, whatever you want to call it,” said Ms. Pelosi, Democrat of California. “If we are strengthening them, then the American people should get some of the upside of that strengthening. Some people call that nationalization.
david e. sanger | nytimes.com | 27-01-2009

Economies Worse Off Than Predicted Just Weeks Ago
The depth of the troubles, analysts say, indicates that nations may need to spend more than the billions of dollars already planned on stimulus packages to jump-start their economies, and that a global recovery could take longer, perhaps pushing into 2010. Analysts are particularly concerned about the slowdown in China and the recession in Europe. There is mounting concern about the stability of the euro and the British pound, which dropped to a 24-year low against the dollar yesterday. Analysts are fretting about the possibility of a debt default in a euro-zone country that could send fresh shock waves through global financial markets.
anthony faiola | washingtonpost.com | 25-01-2009

Wall Street Falls Amid Fears Of Spreading Banking Crisis
New York.- The dawn of the Obama presidency could not shake the stock market from its dejection over the rapidly deteriorating state of the banking industry. The market's angst, which began with multibillion dollar losses reported last week by Bank of America Corp. and Citigroup Inc., intensified after the Royal Bank of Scotland's forecast that its losses for 2008 could top $41.3 billion. The collapse in bank stocks was swift: State Street Corp. plunged 59 percent, Citigroup fell 20 percent and Bank of America lost 29 percent. Royal Bank of Scotland fell 69 percent in New York trading.
tim paradis | huffingtonpost.com | 21-01-2009

Sony To Post $1.1 Billion Loss: Reports
Tokyo.- Sony will post a 100 billion yen ($1.1 billion) operating loss this fiscal year through March, its first since 1995, media reports said Tuesday. The electronics giant has seen sales of its liquid crystal display screens and other products fall, and its bottom line has been hurt by the strong yen, which cuts profits on goods sold abroad, the Nikkei business newspaper and broadcaster NHK reported.
| huffingtonpost.com | 13-01-2009

Ideas for Obama
First, Mr. Obama should scrap his proposal for $150 billion in business tax cuts, which would do little to help the economy. Ideally he’d scrap the proposed $150 billion payroll tax cut as well, though I’m aware that it was a campaign promise. So how can Mr. Obama do more? By including a lot more public investment in his plan — which will be possible if he takes a longer view.
paul krugman | nytimes.com | 12-01-2009

China Losing Taste for Debt From U.S.
Now Beijing is seeking to pay for its own $600 billion stimulus — just as tax revenue is falling sharply as the Chinese economy slows. Regulators have ordered banks to lend more money to small and medium-size enterprises, many of which are struggling with lower exports, and to local governments to build new roads and other projects.
keith bradsher | nytimes.com | 09-01-2009

The Obama Gap
Even the C.B.O. says, however, that “economic output over the next two years will average 6.8 percent below its potential.” This translates into $2.1 trillion of lost production. “Our economy could fall $1 trillion short of its full capacity,” declared Mr. Obama on Thursday. Well, he was actually understating things. To close a gap of more than $2 trillion — possibly a lot more, if the budget office projections turn out to be too optimistic — Mr. Obama offers a $775 billion plan. And that’s not enough.
paul krugman | nytimes.com | 09-01-2009

Stimulus Plan: The Need and the Size
No stimulus can fully succeed if millions of American families continue to lose their homes through foreclosure. Housing markets will continue to decline, people cannot move to take new jobs, and industries such as construction and retail services will continue to shed jobs. Mortgage mitigation efforts to date have failed largely because investors won’t agree to take their losses on bad investments. In my view, the answer is to enable families to write down their home mortgages in bankruptcy – just the way businesses can do with commercial property and people can do with vacation homes and investment properties. This change in bankruptcy law should be part of the stimulus plan.
robert reich | robertreich.blogspot.com | 07-01-2009

Toyota Secretly Developing Solar Powered Green Car
TOKYO — Toyota Motor Corp. is secretly developing a vehicle that will be powered solely by solar energy in an effort to turn around its struggling business with a futuristic ecological car, a top business daily reported Thursday.
yuri kageyama | huffingtonpost.com | 06-01-2009

U.S. Debt Expected To Soar This Year
With President-elect Barack Obama and congressional Democrats considering a massive spending package aimed at pulling the nation out of recession, the national debt is projected to jump by as much as $2 trillion this year, an unprecedented increase that could test the world's appetite for financing U.S. government spending. For now, investors are frantically stuffing money into the relative safety of the U.S. Treasury, which has come to serve as the world's mattress in troubled times. Interest rates on Treasury bills have plummeted to historic lows, with some short-term investors literally giving the government money for free.
lori montgomery | washingtonpost.com | 06-01-2009

Be nice to the Countrries That Lend You Money: Gao Xiqing
In his first interview since the world financial crisis, Gao Xiqing, the man who oversees $200 billion of China’s $2 trillion in dollar holdings, explains why he’s betting against the dollar, praises American pragmatism, and wonders about enormous Wall Street paychecks. And he has a friendly piece of advice: "Be nice to the Countrries That Lend You Money".
james fallows | theatlantic.com | 21-12-2008


In his first interview since the world financial crisis, Gao Xiqing, the man who oversees $200 billion of China’s $2 trillion in dollar holdings, explains why he’s betting against the dollar, praises American pragmatism, and wonders about enormous Wall Street paychecks. And he has a friendly piece of advice: "Be nice to the Countrries That Lend You Money".
james fallows | atlantic.com | 21-12-2008

And Now Deflation
Deflation is more vicious than inflation because it is much harder to reverse deflationary expectations than inflationary ones. Japan's "lost decade" is evidence. The last time America witnessed a fall in consumer prices as large as we have now was in 1947, when wartime mobilization and large-scale government spending were winding down, there was lots of underutilized capacity, and producers and sellers were trying to lure consumers back into the habit of buying. What producers and sellers did not know was that a whole new generation of returning GI's and baby-booming parents were about to spend like mad. Now, the situation is quite different. Rational consumers are starting to save whatever they can because they are understandably worried about the future.
robert reich | robertreich.blogspot.com | 17-12-2008

$73 an Hour: Adding It Up
General Motors, Ford and Chrysler workers make significantly more than their counterparts at Toyota, Honda and Nissan plants in this country. Last year’s concessions by the United Automobile Workers, which mostly apply to new workers, will not change that anytime soon. The real problem is that many people don’t want to buy the cars that Detroit makes. Fixing this problem won’t be nearly so easy.
david leonhardt | nytimes.com | 10-12-2008

Washington Takes Risks With Its Auto Bailout Plans
The realignment of the auto industry described by Barack Obama sounds perilously close to a word no one in his camp wants to say: nationalization.
david e. sanger | nytimes.com | 09-12-2008

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